Cinema (One Too Many Fucking Fashion Events)

“Art is the elimination of the unnecessary.” ~ Pablo Picasso

Okay. I’ve had it. We need some sort of SL Fashion event intervention. This issue stopped being funny several months ago and is now, officially, pissing me off.

Enough with the fucking fashion events. Enough with “exclusive” items. Enough with the laggy, impossible to navigate builds. Enough with room after room of mediocre crap that we have to wade through to get to the handful of quality designers. Enough. Enough. Enough.

We now have events that go on year round, updated each month. Collabor88 was an interesting idea that has run its course or needs to be rethought. Yes, we all love the idea of high quality designers pimping their brand and tossing us a cheap item here and there. In theory, this should have been a great promotional concept to get people to the creator stores. But that isn’t what’s happened. First of all, hardly anything is L$88 anymore. It’s usually L$288 and most of the stuff that gets put out isn’t even worth L$88. A few of the featured designers are offering great quality items, but the bulk of it is sloppy or simply below market standards.

I have become convinced that all this event ridiculousness is simply a means of elevating designers who would otherwise be rightfully ignored for their lack of creativity, talent, or effort.

Consumers and high quality designers are losers in this new event-driven marketplace. It may not seem like it because the designers are making short-term bank and the consumers are still buying. But the overall effect will be and has already begun to be destructive. Events that force designers to create “exclusive” items interrupt the natural creation flow. The designer is no longer on their own schedule. This has had a noticeable effect on quality, forcing even respected designers into a timetable where they cut corners. A prime example of this is Barnesworth Annubis skyboxes at C88. I have been purchasing items from Barnes since he began selling in SL. His name on an item has always meant class and quality. But both of the C88 skyboxes I’ve purchased have had issues that you just don’t normally see in his work. Sides were untextured or didn’t line up as well as they should. When an experienced designer of quality is rushed, consumers suffer and so will the brand. I can no longer buy something from Barnes without second guessing the purchase. So a brand I have trusted without doubt for over six years, I suddenly have to rethink.

This is not the only way respect brand names will suffer. Even if a designer can keep pace and deliver at their usual standard, their relationship with the customers is being undermined. The purpose of these events is to build a relationship between the consumer and the event, not the designer. This devalues the designer store locations and groups. If I can’t go to your store and purchase your new items, why do I need to visit your store at all? Why should I be in your group, if the event is going to announce it anyway? And if I’m not a feed-reader or a blog watcher how do I even know that something’s available?

The high quality content creators are becoming mill workers and promoters for events that are not in the long term best interest of themselves or their customers. All because the crushing costs of store overhead have generated an environment of “desperate to sell” that these event organizers are all too happy to capitalize on.

This is a self-defeating struggle because the main people who benefit from these events are the mediocre crap designers that get plum locations between highly desireable brands and the event organizers themselves. The organizers want to collect booth fees, so they take crap creators. The crap creators get more sales than they deserve, so more and more of them show up. So now, quality brands are not just sacrificing their relationships with their customers, their personal creative processes and their quality, but they’re contributing to the environment that buries them in the glut of crap that makes it hard for them to be discovered by new users in the first place.

“I can’t get my brand out there amid the sea of crap, so I’ll participate in an event that enables a bigger sea of crap will follow.”

Why does everything in SL end up being a fucking way for the mediocre people to get a chance to bat in games they have no business playing in? It’s a disgrace.

I will say this again — location-based events are stupid and unnecessary. They remove one of the main benefits of Second Life and put us back into boxes we don’t have to be locked into. An event organizer could put all their effort into promoting brands. The effort put into unnecessary builds could go into q shopping HUD that delivered Demos and teleports to store locations.

Yes, the rise of the Marketplace and the hideously useless Search problem make it necessary for designers to band together and cross pollinate, but it should be done in a way that doesn’t undermine existing brands, fuck over consumers, and benefit only middlemen and mediocrity.

This has to change and the only people who can make it happen are the big name designers and the blogers. If the designers that motivate people refuse to play by these rules, it will change the whole game. The first step is REFUSING to agree to event-exclusive items and events that hinder direct-to-shop teleports. A big name designer should not have to carry an army of mediocre designers on their back by blackmailing consumers into a hamster maze. The second step is confronting organizers about their lack of quality control. Propping up low quality or unimaginative designers does no one any good. Third, demand organizers focus on what they should be focusing on – PROMOTION. Not building. Not collecting fees for badly made stalls. If you get rid of the expense of SIM rent and building, you can double all that effort on shopping HUDs to ferry people to actual store locations and real promotion.

Cinema is the last event of this nature I am going to blog. Maybe I will shop, maybe I won’t. But I am refusing to continue to promote a practice that is bad for the designers I admire and bad for me as a consumer. I will not continue to put money in the pockets of middlemen and mediocrity. If you’re a blogger who agrees with this and you have an ounce of integrity, I hope you’ll join me.

That said, here were the handful of things worth getting are most of the only things that were worth getting at Cinema:

Zaara's Ritika Dress

Zaara’s Ritika Dress

The only reason I went to Cinema in the first place was to get this dress from Zaara. In case you haven’t guessed from my Flickr feed. I LOVE THIS DRESS. It took Zaara a while to get into the mesh swing, but every item released has been worth waiting for twice over. This feminine sundress, Ritika, is simply sublime. It has the quality in texturing you’ve come to expect from the Zaara brand name with incredibly delicate details, like the beads on the ends of the spaghetti shoulder ties. I could even wear this without the alpha layer it fit so perfectly, but when trying that I did see a bit of leg poke out while walking, so alpha is probably best.

Pink Outfitters ~ Sequin Mini Dress

Pink Outfitters ~ Sequin Mini Dress

If you’ve been waiting your entire SL for a little sequin dress that actually looks like a little sequin dress, your day has come. The Liv Sequin Dress from Pink Outfitters is textured to squeak your squee. It comes in several different colors so you can Shake Your Groove Thing to the hue of your desires. Amazingly effective texturing.

The one consumer concern I’d note with the dress is that the bustline is not a great fit with the SL avatar mesh:

Pink Outfitters - Sequin Dress Bust Issue

Pink Outfitters – Sequin Dress Bust Issue

Because I was going to use this dress for a photo shoot, I spent a good deal of time trying to fit it perfectly. Usually with mesh items, I slip into a copy of my mesh shape and adjust my bust to fill in the “gaps.” For this dress, after thirty minutes I came to the conclusion it just wasn’t possible. No combination of bust settings accommodated the shape. If I made the breasts large enough to meet the front, they swelled out the sides. If I pushed them together, they pushed through the front. Gravity was no help. As you can tell by the photos, this is not an issue when looking at the dress straight-on or from a distance. If you’re going to wear it out dancing or for a romantic night, however, you should try a demo and see if you can live with the fit of the bust.

Liaison Negligee by Volstead

Liaison Negligee by Volstead

The Liaison negligee by Volstead is a yummy item that may be the first really amazing mesh lingerie item. Available in lots of lush colors, the texturing on the silky lace drape and the antique lace accents are outstanding. There is sheen and luster that doesn’t get lost in the alpha of the lace or the shape of the mesh. It hangs smooth down the front with small gathers in the small of the back and along the sides that that provide the sensual realism of a breezy negligee.

Liaison Negligee Modesty Layer

Liaison Negligee Modesty Layer

The mesh see-through lace is made possible with the use of modesty layers instead of the traditional mesh alpha. I really wish designers would offer glitch/modesty layers more often with mesh items, especially for the bust and hemline areas where it would be nice to have the option of coordinating modesty layers instead of the incredible disappearing bust and kitty duo. There is something creepy about sitting down and seeing an invisible crotch where panties would do just fine.

Specific to this item, it would have been nice if the modesty layers had extended to the kitty. I love the femininity of lace, but there are still some things I’d prefer to cover up, especially since with the right bra and panty under layers this would promote this from lingerie to doubling as a darling little slip dress.

Queen's Gambit Pendant - Lassitude & Ennui

Queen’s Gambit Pendant – Lassitude & Ennui

I didn’t need new boots, but I was thrilled that Jackal had a new jewelry item from Lassitude & Ennui. The Queen’s Gambit is a bold pendant that is perfect for all the low cut necklines we’re not supposed to be wearing during Winter. There are gold and silver versions and jewels in various deep near-goth tones. A must-have accessory from a designer that never fails to bring an A-game.

Lastly we come to the items and designer that broke the camel’s back and exhausted my tolerance for the fashion event glut. My experience with CandyDoll pretty much underscores why the event system sucks for consumers.

Mushu Lingerie & Lacely Top From CandyDoll

Mushu Lingerie & Lacely Top From CandyDoll

This is the Mushu Lingerie set and the Lacely Top From CandyDoll which should have all been one big set but weren’t.

So, when I entered Cinema and was forced to the front (because God-fucking-forbid you be allowed to teleport directly to a store) I was spammed with a message about how the build and most of the stuff at the event was mesh and I had to have a a mesh viewer, etc etc. Whatever. At lest there wasn’t the passive-aggressive script bullshit or some “woe is me” pity beg about how hard the organizer worked on the event. However, because of that message, I assumed most of the offerings I would encounter – especially event exclusive items – would be mesh. That was my assumption, but I think it was a reasonable one.

Cut to who know how long later when I lagged into CandyDoll. I was drawn to the displays for the Mushu Lingerie and the Lacely Top:

CandyDoll Mushu Lingerie Display

CandyDoll Mushu Lingerie Display

CandyDoll Lacely Top Display

CandyDoll Lacely Top Display

I go back and forth in my mind about whether these displays are deliberately misleading or simply confusing out of laziness or ignorance. However, it did not occur to me that the model was wearing prim breasts; I just assumed the sliders were all the way up. After all, her lips take up 1/3 of her face, but I didn’t assume she was wearing prim lips. Since the sour patch kids and invisible pony riders came into SL vogue, I’ve long stopped trying to guess about what the hell is going on with models in store displays. However, please note that NOWHERE on these displays does it say “for use with X prim breasts.” Nor were there prim breasts for sale in the store. My first thought was that these were mesh tops with system panties. Not finding demos, I then assumed the top was a sculpt with a GOS-like system where you buy the first set at full price and additional colors at slightly lower cost. So I grabbed one of the full price blouse and lingerie and then a couple colors of the “applicator.”

Ordinarily, I wouldn’t have done this. This is the frustrating evil of these stupid fucking events: they coerce otherwise educated consumers to make poor purchase decisions. In a store setting, I would have bought one, tried it on and decided about other colors later. But this was an EVENT and I felt it was rude to strip down into lingerie. Also, the lag of putting things on and off was prohibitive. Yes, I could have gone home and tried it on, but then I’d have to come back and I couldn’t just make a landmark to teleport back to the shop stall, I’d have to go to the start and hope to find this place in the sea of room after room. No one held a gun to my head. The purchases were my choice. But you see how the event system puts pressure onto the consumer to make bad purchase choices. The result was that a highly educated consumer (me) ended up spending far too much money on a meh-to-mid-level designer. A store that should have only gotten about L$400 of my business got L$1500.

Had I understood what I was purchasing, I’d have gotten maybe a top and a single lingerie set. To be honest, I likely would have passed on them entirely. When I got home and unpacked everything, I came to understand the full-priced items were only system layers and the lower priced applicators were for something I didn’t get with the full price purchase pack. There was no notecard or anything to explain what the hell the applicator was for.

So, I contacted the CandyDoll creator, Rebeca Dembo, and explained what I had purchased and that I didn’t understand what the applicators were to be applied to, as I’d only been given system layers in the first purchases. I got back the following:

rebeca Dembo: applies is for Lola’s prim breast and befor u have to buy them do you can use the appliers

Not. Even. Kidding. That was her customer service response.

Ms. Dembo’s profile boasts “I’m not rude, I’m honest.” Her picks include some banter about kicking someone’s ass, a plug for her blog, a store policy that is nothing but keywords, and a curt “I don’t give review copies” blurb. That combined with the fact that her language skills seemed, at best, a bit challenging, I decided I had two choices:

1) Eat the money I’d spent on applicators and chalk it up to my own bad consumer choices;
2) Go back and purchase the full versions to demonstrate my goodwill as a consumer and then request refunds for the applicators.

I opted for 2. I figured it was cute enough and I do like having panties and strapless bras to wear under items in different colors (you never know what will match). So I went back to the CandyDoll room (which took me forever to find again), re-purchased the items at the higher price for the system layers instead of the application versions, and even bought an extra couple since I’d had to go back anyway. I also snapped the photos of the displays because I already knew I wanted to blog the experience. Only then — after demonstrating my goodwill by purchasing the replacements at full price and additional items — did I request a refund for the previously purchased applicators. That seemed more than fair to fulfill my responsibilities as a consumer.

Salome: I have gone back and re-purchased these items in the normal clothing layers. I request a refund for the “Applier” versions that were previously purchased. Your displays are not at all clear regarding this issue.

She asked for me to provide the transactions, which I did, and if I’d simply gotten my refund at that point, I’d have been annoyed with the experience, but less than I am now. Instead, I got attitude about how the displays were marked “applicator” and anyone could check the content tab. I was told I had to buy prim breasts to use the applicators. Only after restating firmly that I didn’t have or want prim breasts did I get the refund I requested.

Dembo wasn’t overly dramatic or a fire-breathing bitch. Her customer service skills with me sucked and she seemed more interested in being defensive than in keeping a customer. I have no intention to ever purchase from her again, but that’s my experience. She may deliver wonderful customer service to people that don’t make her feel defensive. I have no way to know. To be honest, although I’m disappointed in my exchange with her, I blame her less than I blame the event.

The reality is that everything negative about this experience was caused by the event location. The pressure to buy without fully examining/trying. The low prim requirements that enable deceptive and confusing displays. The fact that I was expecting the items to be mesh because the event was promoting itself as a mesh event. The fact that a designer I would ordinarily have been happy to never discover was shuffled in with the likes of Zaara.

And while CandyDoll was my personal problem, there were plenty of other stores I saw with misleading displays. Such as Shi:

Shi Misleading Display

Shi Misleading Display

The text below this display reads:
“These merchandise are rigged mesh. Please try DEMO before purchase. Thank you!”

The problem is that not everything on that wall is rigged mesh with a demo. The coat on the right (which was the only one that interested me) had no demo. I assume it’s sculpted, but have no idea. When I was in the store there were two other people talking about the coat, trying to find the demo. Their conversation mused that it was mesh, but the designer forgot to put the demo out, or that the creator didn’t speak English very well and maybe mislabeled the demo. One even said “Maybe we should just get it anyway.” I suggested they contact the creator to which the response was “Ugh, but then we’ll have to come back to get it.” I left not knowing if they purchased.

When I was in the store beside Shi, I read another girl’s open chat “Where’s the demo for the coat?” and someone answered “I don’t see it either.” No idea if they bought. But if two different pairs of friend shoppers and myself all encountered the confusion over the display in the few minutes I was in the vicinity, I have to believe it happened over and over.

Impulse purchases can be fun. I have no problem with events encouraging shoppers to buy things they might not ordinarily try. But there is a huge problem when consumers are pressured into buying items that are deceptively or confusingly displayed. There is a huge problem in enabling low-level designers and promoting them on par with the leaders in our marketplace.

I know this is like a 3500 word entry. I am sorry for that and I thank you for sticking with me if you got this far. I also hope, if you are a blogger, that you will join me in refusing to blog events like this, unless they alter their practices.

If we continue to promote things that do not serve the best interests of the brands we admire and the consumer practices we have the right to expect, then the consequences are going to be on us.

Erm. Happy weekend.

About the Stuff:
CandyDoll ~ Mushu Lingerie ~ L$190
CandyDoll ~ Lacely Top ~ L$170
lassitude & ennui ~ Queen’s gambit necklace ~ L$100
Pink Outfitters ~ Liv Sequin Dress ~ L$300
Volstead ~ Liaison Negligee ~ L$350
Zaara ~ Ritika Maxi Dress ~ L$450

Hair: Various Truth Styles

This entry was posted in Bombastastic, Fashion Accessories SL, Fashion SL, Hair SL, Second Life, SL - Shopping, SL - Social Dysfunction, Virtual Living. Bookmark the permalink.

65 Responses to Cinema (One Too Many Fucking Fashion Events)

  1. I’m with you…even though I found Cinema to be slightly less annoying as an event than Vintage Fair. I really do hate not being able to teleport to the individual booths, but they do that so the ummm….. also-rans don’t complain. You have to go by the ummm…. not-so-good booths to get to the stuff you actually went there to get. @#$@#$ event specific items. HUD events people…you want me to go to your stores so I can see even MORE of your stuff to spend my L$ on. It’s not like these event hosts are doing anything other than providing booths….It’s not like they have live DJ’s or blogger parties or orgies with vintage loving redheads at these events. They don’t even hold a runway event or two.

    I hate the state of marketing and promotion in SL…hass annoyed me to no end for years. Though I do think the events are prodding some “oldbie and goodie” designers to make new stuff. Nice to see some new L&E Jewelry, though I’m hoping for a non-victorian/gothy looking classic knee high boot with a moderately high heel, between 85 to 100mm equivalent, mind you. The Bax heel is too high, damn it, and none of G Fields boots are classic enough

    I must have missed the Zaara both.. @#$@# build design. I see you’re wearing Truth Mayim…the frickin demo refused to rez properly for me so I haven’t picked it up yet.

  2. Iris Ophelia says:

    I used to go to just about every event, but these days I only go to one a month. I still like Collabor88 even if I agree it’s strayed from its original intentions. But here’s the thing, we’re absolutely in the minority. Lost of people still attend events, traffic is strong, there’s no real reason for people to do fewer events when they still get a strong turn-out. As it stands now if organizers reduce the number of events they’re running, new organizers will just take their place anyway. The most you can realistically expect is for designers to stop stretching themselves so thin, but even bad products can rake in sales at a big event so that’s a pretty big sacrifice to ask them to make to help change a perception that they may not even share.

    And more to the point, these items will be forgotten in a couple months anyway, and as a blogger my use for limited items is just that. Limited. An event exclusive item is nearly useless to me once the event is over because I can’t direct anyone else where to get it. So I came to realize at some point it’s really not worth the hassle unless something really REALLY catches my eye.

    So if you don’t like an event or you’re not in the mood or whatever, don’t feel obligated to go. If enough people feel the same, the problem will resolve itself.

  3. Salome says:

    My concern is less about the frequency of events or the abstaining from events. I’m an adult; I can choose not to go and I pass on more than I attend.

    My concern is that the event system, as it stands now only benefits medicore designers and event promoters who lack creative ideas and fall back on lazy routines.

    As I said, I recognize the need for brands to cross pollinate; the current means of getting noticed on the grid are frustrating. But the current practices are only going to make that harder by assuring that below market quality brands are the primary benefactors.

    The big name designers and the bloggers who enable this behavior will lose out the biggest in the long run; the designers because they are sacrificing their own locations, groups, customer relationships, and brand quality — the bloggers because we will be inundated with more and more mediocrity,

    I appreciate that people have to make sales, but all it takes is for a few big name designers to put their feet down and do the following:
    1. Demand quality control
    2. Demand shop-to-shop teleport
    3. Demand an end to event exclusive items
    4. Put pressure on organizers to move beyond location-based events.

    Change can happen gradually. It doesn’t have to be one big tidal wave that suddenly washes everything else away.

  4. Eboni Khan says:

    While you are complaining about lack of attention to detail, you should change your blog post title to the correct spelling of Cinema. No one is perfect.

  5. Salome says:

    Good catch. All fixed.

    Thank goodness I wasn’t charging anyone for the blog post.

  6. Events benefit a vast number of designers, not just those medicore ones you keep referring to. Any small not as well recognised designer benefits from events.

    Quality control is something that happens at a lot of events, however just because someone doesnt like something doesnt make it a bad item. While you obviously didnt like our item at cinema a number of people did. Individuals have different tastes and the advantage of an event is that it allows for loads of different tastes in the one place.

    I dont see an issue with expecting creators to make something new for an event. Otherwise you will get a heap of old or recoloured stuff for every event and where is the benefit in that for anyone? The items can be sold in our mainstores after the event 99% of the time.

    Its up to designers themselves to balance releases between events and make decisions when to pull back from events because they are getting to be too much. IF a designer is making lower quality items for events in the end they will lose out, so its in their best interests to limit the events and produce as good items as they can

  7. Salome says:

    I had no problem with your item at the event. I didn’t see the need to include it in this blog entry because it’s already been blogged to death.

    There is a difference between quality that maintains market standards and taste. Too many designers hide behind “people have different tastes” when in reality they’re recycling crappy templates and / or building styles from 2008.

    The only benefit in the current system for good designers is the short term money. I’ve already explained at length the consequences of this system. I have no problem with people who disagree, except that they’re enabling a system that once again is bad for the overall market.

    SL has become a format that champions mediocrity. I think it’s a shame and I will continue to point it out. These events are a big example of that right now.

  8. Then prehaps changing the word of the sentence “That said, here were the handful of things worth getting at Cinema” would be beneficial since you certainly wrote like every item you didnt blog wasnt worth getting, which is rather insulting

  9. Salome says:

    If you’re secure that your item is good, you don’t need my validation, nor should anyone.

    There were a handful of items worth getting. Yours was one of them. There were also a few poses and some furniture.

    I didn’t realize everyone needed a gold star.

  10. I think you missed the point. I dont need validation but you made a blanket statement that those were the only things worth getting at the entire event in your post and that the overall quality wasnt great. Thats obviously not as valid as you originally stated since you now state there are numerous other items you liked as well but didnt buy and/or blog

  11. Amanda says:

    I agree with you too. I found the build way too expansive for the actual content there was on offer, plus, unless I am very much mistaken, isn’t the event called “Cinema”?

    If that’s the case, what on earth has all that stuff got to do with films, movies, TV shows etc? I thought the event was to promote film & TV based items, but a lot of the products there have little or no link to Hollywood etc., which makes the event even more misleading. For instance, please tell me how any of the items you purchased and blogged are actually linked to the theme of the event, because I’m struggling to see it.

    On the subject of designers, stores and exclusives, if designers really want to attract brand loyalty, then perhaps they should use their damn VIP groups properly. Use those to send out the exclusives, to keep the customers happy and lapping up the regular releases whilst awaiting the freebie like Pavlov’s dog. I’ve been a member of a few VIP groups, some that charged and were pretty good, down to one particular designer who charged a small fortune to join her “VIP” group, then all she ever did was send out notices on the new products and then make the group free to join anyway, after making a small fortune out of people like me.

    Stop these monthly events and if someone MUST run one, at least make sure the damn thing is on topic, eh?

  12. Salome says:

    And I said a handful. There were not numerous other items. The overall quality of the majority of the items was below market quality.

    I’m sorry you felt left out.

  13. Mookie says:

    You were going to have a problem with the event from the start. It’s obvious that was your intention, if you are going to give a negative post about it; at least be honest that you set out to do that. You are tacky and bitter for what reason I don’t know but you are like so many other unhappy people in second life that nitpick and find fault with everything but yourself and equally tacky friends. While I would like to go on and on about your bitchy whine fest, I would like to say that if you spent as much time fixing your avatar up a little more, learn how to take better pictures and maybe see the glass as half full vices half empty, you’d find more joy in the simply things. But I am sure your post and subsequent drama is the highlight of your week, so carry on with your pathetic attempts at trying to make someone feel less than you clearly feel about yourself.

  14. Salome says:

    It’s always fun when the Plurk kids show up to play.

    I have a problem with location based events. They’re unimaginative, lazy, and an example of people not using the format to its best benefit. I’ve well established that in my blog. That said I don’t show up to hate anything. The implication is silly.

    I do evaluate what I find as a consumer.

    Thank you for the tips on my avatar. I’ll take it under advisement. The photos, however, are intended to display the products for consumer purposes, not to fan my pixel vanity.

    Now go be positive and find your joy instead of nit picking.

  15. While I’m sure you made some TRULY enlightening points in this post I’m afraid I don’t have time to read such a long and dedicated post to negatively criticizing my event and the creators who participated in it. However, I’d just like to mention a few things.

    I am EXTREMELY proud of every single creator who participated in Cinema. Is every single store the absolute best store in Second Life? No, of course not. But just because a store isn’t a huge brand or because they aren’t quite at the top of their game yet, doesn’t mean they don’t deserve a chance to participate in something fun. No one is forcing you to buy their items if you don’t like them. But it’s incredibly rude and disrespectful to state that anything at this event was badly done. People did the best they could, and sometimes their best isn’t going to win any awards, but so what? They are having fun, and just because YOU don’t like it doesn’t mean that plenty of others aren’t happy to have it.

    As for the forced landing point, Cinema is primarily a shopping event, yes, but it was also about the experience of the movie theater. A LOT of work went into that custom build, from concept to design to modeling to texturing, it was a massive undertaking for the sake of doing something spectacular and unique. The reason the landing is forced to the front isn’t so that people would have to go to the “bad” stores on their way to the “good” stores. It was so people could see and appreciate the fact that this was a CINEMA. You enter in from the outside and through the lobby, just as you would to go to a theater in the real world. If I were trying to get the “bad” stores shown first, I would have just shoved all the “good” stores in the back of each theater wouldn’t I? Of course then I’d have to consult you first to find out who the “good” and “bad” stores are, since you clearly ARE the expert.

    Frankly, I think this post just reeks of the sense of entitlement so many people feel in Second Life these days. As though I created this event for you or anyone alone. I’m sorry, but no one owes you anything. If you hate events so much, just don’t go to them, it’s very simple. I’m happy to take criticism about what I do because that criticism helps me to make the next event better. Just as Cinema was better than Festival of Sin and every month Zodiac gets better, too. And my next event, will be even better than all of them because we learn and grow and take that criticism. (Much like the creators you’ve bashed in this post… who are learning and growing.) However, this isn’t criticism, this is just whining. Fortunately, the 8000+ visits to Cinema since the 13th and the tremendous feedback from creators about the success of their sales have shown that more people appreciate my events, or any events, and are likely eager to see what The Hottie Cooterati Experience has in store in the future. I’m grateful to those who value the work that goes into these events, from myself and the participating stores.

    The only thing you achieved here is upsetting 100 creators who will most certainly remember you as just a negative, entitled, whining troll. So good luck with that.

  16. Salome says:

    I’m sorry, I would have loved to read your comment, but I didn’t have time.

  17. lolllllllllllllll yes you did… and I know you did. So I’m good with that :))

  18. I’m sorry but isn’t the solution incredibly simple here? If you don’t like fashion events….simply don’t go.

    Ta da!

    Problem solved!

  19. Salome says:

    I understand that egos get tangled around common sense, and I really can’t respond to anyone that doesn’t read what I have to say but decides to get upset about it.

    I like SL fashion. I’ve been covering it for a long time. I want to support good designers, contribute to causes that eliminate the glut of crap in the market and focus, as I always have, on what benefits the consumer.

    As for “if you don’t like it, don’t go” that works both ways. If you don’t like what I have to say don’t read my blog.

    Ta da!

    Problem solved!

  20. I’m glad you like SL fashion and that you want to support good designers. Good luck finding any who want to support you after this :)

  21. noe says:

    Who are you anyway to bash events this way?

  22. Sick Of These Attacks says:

    I am REALLY sorry but you come on! This is their opinion and if you guys actually got your heads out of your prim butts you would actually stop & realize that this is basically a review. If you don’t like something you are allowed to say you hate it. If you love it you say you love it. THAT is what opinions are. THAT is what reviews are. If you can stop lapping up the fashion “OMG I MUST BUY IT” for one second you might actually find out how stupid you all sound. Attacking someone on their own blog. Go photoshop something to make it look better then it really looks. Or…oh…wait a minute…say you are SOOOOO busy writing your fashion blogs. (Fans self) Must be such HARD WORK to make everyone happy. Please. Get a life. All of you.

  23. I feel for Ruby on one hand, the build was awesome, and it was obvious how much time and effort had been put into it. It was just unfortunate that I, like a lot of people I’d imagine, can’t be walking round with my draw distance beyond 30m or so without experiencing crazy lag, therefore the visual achievement of the event (the real success of the event’s entirety as far as I’m concerned) was impossible to be appreciated. The event was a lagfest anyway, despite the ‘script gates’ and the lag made shopping there an incredibly frustrating event, for me. I’m sure those lucky people with better systems had an easier time. I think the lesson is one that the hair fair organizers only just grasped this last year, that people go to these events to SHOP, and as lovely as an ambitious build is, it’s no good if it impedes people from spending their lindens.

    My issues with Cinema, beyond my personal lag problems, was that I just didn’t like much of what I saw. That’s not a criticism of Ruby, or the creators even really, it’s just my personal opinion. In fact in the 20 mins or so I spent there the only place I spent money was at Ruby’s store because she had obviously committed to the theme and the quality of poses was really super. That was another issue I think, only maybe half of the stores I got to had created with the theme in mind. The rest of the stores seemed to have just picked a few random products and put them out. All in all Cinema was a great idea, but somehow didn’t quite work for me.

    As far as the other sales/monthly events go, I couldn’t agree with you more Salome. The quality of item available at these events IS considerably lower than what’s been available in the past. I also totally agree with your points on Marketplace. As far as I’m concerned it’s slowly killing the notion of actually visiting stores inworld to shop. Creators of course will have to evolve and try new things to keep their walk-in traffic up if that’s important to them but I don’t think diluting the quality of item for the plethora of events and sales is the answer. Especially as the prices for these items aren’t going down! Quite the opposite. I find it interesting that your article came across, to one person at least, as ‘reeking of self entitlement’ as, for me, creators offering lesser quality items at the same prices, or steadily increasing as with C88, strikes me as being far more so.

    Now, what about all these fundraiser events!? Let’s talk about THOSE. I’m off to start organising mine, my hamster’s last vet bill was astronomical.

  24. Garrett Ceriano says:

    So much work and creativity and time went into Cinema as well as the other mentioned events and to break it down like this is repulsive. Pushing content creators and event organizers into the mud and calling them crap doesn’t really help consumers. It does ruin your reputation however. For what it’s worth, I never knew who you were before this rancid post and much like you coming to Cinema and enjoying it to the extent you have, I have found this post enlightening and wont be returning to your blog anytime soon. Take care and try to stay out of trouble. *takes your fashion police badge away* You’ve been relieved of duty.

  25. Salome says:

    Okay I’ll start a few responses that will be too long for plunk attention span theater to read.

    Dear Ruby,

    I have zero idea who you are personally, but if you’re the organizer of Cinema I only know you as your role – the organizer and the promoter. I’m sure you worked very hard on the event. I have no idea or comment regarding that. In my opinion, on my blog the result was lackluster and frustrating.

    You failed to use the format to the benefit of SL consumers or the top level designers that we should be supporting. Yes, it’s SL and no one can handle criticism, but your’e a guest on my blog. I allowed your comments to be posted. So coming here and screaming about my sense of entitlement when you also state you can’t be bothered to read what I wrote makes you look like a bit of an hysteric.

    You came up with a theme and you either built or commissioned a hamster maze. Some people think it was a very nice hamster maze. I did not. I appreciate that builds for large numbers of people have to make building compromises. Which just underscores all the more reasons to not have them.

    I cannot address what you are proud of or why, but I will address a few of your comments:

    “Is every single store the absolute best store in Second Life? No, of course not.”

    If you concede this is true, then why is anyone upset about it? You knowingly included stores that were subpar. So it’s not controversial; it’s accepted truth.

    “But just because a store isn’t a huge brand or because they aren’t quite at the top of their game yet, doesn’t mean they don’t deserve a chance to participate in something fun.”

    Let’s be truthful here. Including low level designers isn’t about them being allowed to have fun — it’s about organizers collecting the stall fees and/or percentages. To a smaller extent it’s about rewarding the sycophants that make low quality items but kiss the right ass. If it was just about “fun” you wouldn’t have forced the rest of us to wade through all the crap to get to the good stuff. Forcing people to be exposed to the lower quality increases the chances of impulse buying and justifies the money charged to them for their rental fee or whatever other arrangements were made.

    And, I’ll even go a step further. I will say that I don’t think they deserve a chance to participate in something side by side with the people who make quality items. There are a number of quality designers in SL and I do not like all of them as people. But I respect that they put massive amounts of time and energy into their craft. I respect that they have talent and wish to put it out there. I respect that they pay for overhead and land fees and hire customer service reps and maintain blogs and stores to be part of the SL economy.

    I don’t respect someone who buys a template, downloads the last version of Filter Forge and gets the same benefit as the other designers because they should be allowed to “have fun.” The reason it’s so hard for good designers to get their brands out there is because of this mindset that everyone should have a chance to hoist their crap on the grid. It’s a free grid, no one can stop anyone, nor should they be able to. But be very clear on this — these types of events are benefiting the organizers and the crappy designers far more than they are benefiting the good designers or the consumers. And anyone able to look at the situation critically understands that.

    “No one is forcing you to buy their items if you don’t like them.”

    As I said in the blog post you didn’t read, I take responsibility for my choices as a consumer. However I do resent the pressure and intentional frustrations put in place to deliberately reward poor consumer choices.

    “But it’s incredibly rude and disrespectful to state that anything at this event was badly done.”

    I’m not concerned with showing respect to something I don’t approve of when I’m writing on my own blog. I felt Cinema was badly done. That’s called honesty and opinion. It’s what a blogger owes to their readership. Those would be the people who read the blog.

    “The reason the landing is forced to the front isn’t so that people would have to go to the “bad” stores on their way to the “good” stores. It was so people could see and appreciate the fact that this was a CINEMA.”

    Let’s say I believe you. Let’s say you’ve actually fooled yourself into believing that making people wade through 50 bad stores to get to the one they’re looking for isn’t about you justifying your fees. Your defense is that people should be forced to take in the build? Because the builder’s ego is more important than making things convenient for your consumers. If everyone liked the build so much why didn’t you let it stand on its merits instead of imposing your will on them?

    “Of course then I’d have to consult you first to find out who the “good” and “bad” stores are, since you clearly ARE the expert.”

    I’ll be happy to help with this at any time. Feel free to IM me in world.

    “Frankly, I think this post just reeks of the sense of entitlement so many people feel in Second Life these days.”

    You designed your event to force people to experience it the way you wanted them to. You came to my blog to insult me and go nuts over my opinion. But I’m the one with a sense of entitlement. Check.

    “If you hate events so much, just don’t go to them, it’s very simple.”

    If there weren’t “exclusive” items at events I wouldn’t go to them. NOR WOULD THE MAJORITY OF SHOPPERS which is why you force vendors to have them. So it’s not quite that simple, is it? If you’re so certain everyone would love and appreciate your event regardless, why not stop holding things hostage to force people to walk through hamster mazes to get to the good items?

    “I’m happy to take criticism about what I do because that criticism helps me to make the next event better.”

    Sorry, I just had to highlight that line. For the lulz.

    “However, this isn’t criticism, this is just whining.”

    I leave that to readers. The ones who, you know, read the posts.

    “The only thing you achieved here is upsetting 100 creators who will most certainly remember you as just a negative, entitled, whining troll. So good luck with that.”

    I don’t think you understand what a troll is or does. You came here. I didn’t go to you. Just saying’

    “I’m glad you like SL fashion and that you want to support good designers. Good luck finding any who want to support you after this”

    Okay first of all, I’m not worried about designers supporting me. I’m a consumer. Everything I got from Cinema, I bought. Which means I paid for the right to my opinion, even though I’d be perfectly entitled to my opinion without dropping a dime.

    As for those who are eager to ban someone based on an opinion, that speaks to their character, not mine. I will live with the consequences of my actions and if that includes pissing off people who can’t fathom that others hold opinions they don’t like, that’s five by five.

    I think SL consumers deserve better than to be herded like lemmings through a casino maze designed to make them play another round of blackjack. I think the top SL designers shouldn’t have to carry a mountain of crap on their backs just so organizers can collect more fees and justify more events.

    And most of the people who have a problem with my position are those profiting from the current system and the people who pet and enable them.

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